Amalen the Artivist

Sticking out a paint-covered hand, Amalen reaches over to greet a new arrival at the Rhizome Collective “It’s Dry!” he assures them, with a warm smile. Easy going and friendly, Amalen spent much of his time at COY and COP23 practicing “art-ivism”, as he calls it: the practice of using art as a medium for activism work. Amalen not only made

Climate Action Artivism
Amalen built a massive puppet of the Kali, the Hindu Goddess of Death & New Life for the Climate March. The Goddess demonstrated a strong woman beating back the greedy capitalist destroying the world.

his own banners, capes, puppets, posters, and prints, but he helped others to do so as well. He was one of three people leading the ArtSpace at this year’s conference. Along with Danny & Kevin, they set up a space where youth could gather and provided resources for their creative expression with the goal of launching actions and campaigns, protests and calls for support during the two weeks of UN negotiations on climate change.

Amalen is from Malaysia, and has spent nearly a decade dedicated to environmental justice, indigenous rights, and capacity-building. Long before I even knew what that word meant, Amalen was leading training sessions on how to communicate your message, organize volunteers, and influence policy in creative & effective ways. He even spent time leading corporate trainings commercially. I had the pleasure of getting to know Amalen over the past year. He participated in Care About Climate’s Online Youth Exchange, where we gathered in online webinars to discuss some of the very same issues that he trained people on. We met in person in July in China during the CYCAN International Youth Summit on Energy & Climate Change. 

Climate Sign from Great Wall of China with OYE and IYSECC participants

When we went to visit Amalen in the Rhizome ArtSpace during Week 1 of COP, he gave us a quick tour, then put us to work on making a banner for our action: asking negotiators to step up their Nationally Determined Contributions to close the emissions gap to protect the lives and livelihoods of future generations. “Start with a quick background on your fabric, it makes the words stand out really well and draws attention towards the center! There are paints and rollers over in that bin. Just remember, personal responsibility is sexy, so please clean up after yourself!” We got to work painting as he scurried off to help another group. There were at least four actions planned for Thursday, and more on Friday- each requiring a team working alongside each other in the Rhizome.

Amalen is also the coordinator for the Actions Working Group among the youth in COP this year, and used his

organizational skills to create an easy-to-use form to register an action with UN security (under the UNFCCC Secretariat) and a spreadsheet of all the actions that were planned so that we could support each other’s events and draw a crowd. Amalen is a fantastic leader, in that he knows when to step back and let others shine, while supporting in the background. He is a critical thinker, creative and mentor. Back home, he serves as Chief Executive Farmer at Tu:Gu with his friend Kelvin, another youth delegate at COP23. They started their aeroponics farm less than 6 months ago with all recycled and repurposed materials. 

Klima Schutzen- Kohle Stoppen
Amalen wears his No Coal No Oil No Gas cape at a second Climate March in Bonn

A “typical” day at COP for him looks like this:

7:00 Wake up

8:15 Leave for Bonn Zone

9:00 YOUNGO daily meeting

10:00 Actions working group meeting

11:00 Zip over to Bula Zone to catch some negotiations

12:00 Bike back into the center of Bonn to open the ArtSpace

12:00 Send emails about that day’s actions

14:00 Make some fabric prints

16:00 Take inventory of supplies and pick up more

18:00 ArtSpace fills with youth, community members, and other Art-tivists

22:00 ArtSpace closes, some people stay late to finish

23:00 Start cleaning up and hang the last of the banners to dry

00:00 Arrive back at the hostel, start working on press releases, and check emails

3:00 Climb in bed

This is just a taste of what Amalen does, as there is so much more that he was going each day that I missed. While COP is over now, If you’re in Bonn, be sure to go visit the Rhizome Collective at  Dorotheenstrabe 99, Bonn. And check out some of the powerful actions Amalen has done in the past in this trailer to the film, Voices Not Heard: The Climate Fight of Malaysian Youth, by Director Scott Brown. 

If you’re interested in seeing or screening the film with your school or organization, please contact Scott Brown at scottbrown@u.northwestern.edu

#Climatesign COY13 Bonn Germany UNFCCC Adriana Valenzuela JimenezUNFCCC Focal Point COY13 Youth
From left, the Author, UNFCCC Focal point on Education & Youth, and Amalen flash the Climate Sign after moderating the opening ceremony of COY13

By Sarah Voska

Sarah Voska is a delegate to the UN climate change conference, COP23, and the director of the Online Youth Exchange. She studies Sustainable Management at University of Wisconsin-Parkside. Use the #ClimateSign to join the fight against climate change. Contact us at careaboutclimate@gmail.com with any questions!

Talanoa Mada ~ Youth Stand for Climate Action

For the past three days, over 1000 students, youth and young professionals converged in a high school in the outskirts of Bonn to define policy goals for COP, share strategies, and brainstorm ideas for how to combat climate change. The Thirteenth Conference of Youth, or COY13, was a place for youth to come together to prepare for the UN climate change conference (COP23) and another year of environmental activism around the world.

Photo rights to COY13 Germany COP23 Bonn Climate Sign Action
Participants raise the Climate Sign during the Opening Ceremony. Photo courtesy of COP13 PR team.

There were over 300 program contributions, consisting of workshops, presentations, and panel discussions. There was also an art space active throughout all three days, where the participants could make banners and signs for the Climate March, as well as other actions directed at building momentum and pushing negotiators towards stronger action.COY13

One session that I felt was really helpful was called “Combatting Isolationism in the Environmental Movement. The session recognized the number of environmentalists killed annually: a sobering 100 activists, or two a week, worldwide. It also addressed the issue of disconnected activists, who work outside the framework of a formal organization. For them, it can be extremely difficult, and even dangerous to do their work. Without resources, recognition, or support, they are most likely to burn out or be discouraged.

Photo courtesy of COY13

At the end of the session, we talked about how we all must work together. We are all working towards the same goal, of stronger commitments to greenhouse gas emission reduction, reforestation, reduction of plastic and food waste, and access to climate change education, mitigation resources, and adaptation strategies for people all around the world, regardless of nationality, ethnicity, gender or wealth.

This communal theme ran through all of COY, and positive energy flowed through all the participants as we engaged in the conference theme of Talanoa Mada, which essentially means “Let’s talk” in Fijian. It connotes a participatory dialogue about how to combat issues that affect the entire community. As we move into the first week of COP23, the participatory dialogue will be a focus of the Fijian Presidency. Lagi Seru, a Fijian delegate and COY13 team member, describes Talanoa Mada:

Lagi Seru from Fiji. Photo courtesy of COY13

Talanoa is an everyday part of Fijian life. Creating a harmonizing environment for all, it brings together people to give thoughts and share opinions without the fear of retribution. People can freely voice their concerns, no finger pointing, and take the time to offer practical solutions at this space.”

Throughout COY13, special care was taken to support diversity, inclusion, well-being and equity, so that everyone felt that their voice were heard and valued. So many solutions were shared through case studies, brainstorming sessions, and workshops over the three day conference, and the participants left on Saturday encouraged, motivated and united for climate action, whether in their local communities, on their school/university campuses, and during COP23.

With youth from 114 countries worldwide, there was a great diversity within the venue. Everywhere you went, there was a burst of languages, laughter, and bright colors- from the clothing, flags, and signs born by the participants. Despite, or more accurately, because of the great diversity, there was a sort of synergy. Together, with so many different ideas, perspectives and experiences, we are able to overcome any roadblocks and obstacles we faced. Policy papers were written on behalf of the working groups, new partnerships were formed between overseas organizations, and those going into the COP23 negotiations were carefully prepared for strategic engagementduring the conference. COY13 was an incredible model of collaboration and participation. Whether it was through their food waste diversion programs, or morning yoga sessions, it gave us all the energy & focused determination that we needed to move into the tough negotiations of these next two weeks.

Vikaka & Danke to the entire COY13 organizing team!

Climate Sign
COY13 Stands in Solidarity for climate action using the Climate Sign, with Fiji PM & COP23 President Frank Bainamamara, Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa, Mayor Ashok-Alexander Sridharan, & UNFCCC Focal Point on Education & Youth Adriana Valenzuela.

 

By Sarah Voska

Sarah Voska is a delegate to the UN climate change conference, COP23, and the director of the Online Youth Exchange. She studies Sustainable Management at University of Wisconsin-Parkside. Use the #ClimateSign to join the fight against climate change. Contact us at careaboutclimate@gmail.com with any questions!

Press Release: Statement by US and Chinese Youth Directed at Our Presidents and President-Elect

 

For Immediate Release

CYCAN and CAC delegates present their joint statement directed to their leaders.

Marrakesh, Morocco-  Dear President Barack Obama, President Xi Jinping, and President-Elect Donald Trump,

Last year the world came together to create the Paris Agreement. Both the United States and China have ratified this agreement. However, we still have a lot to do, and US and Chinese governments are morally as well as legally responsible to do everything in their power to address climate change as soon as possible.  As the two largest global economies and greenhouse gas emitters, our countries have the opportunity to lead the world forward in climate action.

In this statement CYCAN and CAC seek to share a unified vision for what we expect the United States and China to support in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties 22 (UNFCCC COP 22) and beyond, and in doing so, continue to build stronger working relationships between our two countries. We are calling for action from both parties to work on pre-2020 ambitions, adaptation, climate finance and loss & damage. This must be done while promoting and considering “obligations to human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity.”

The US and China need to share technological resources and provide capacity-building to developing countries in order to provide the tools necessary for countries to adapt to climate change, including addressing impacts to agriculture, coastal cities, and vulnerable populations.  Last September, the United States reaffirmed its $3 billion pledge to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and China announced that it would make available 20 billion Renminbi for setting up the China South-South Climate Cooperation Fund to support other developing countries to combat climate change.

We call on the United States and China to provide a clear pathway to providing finance to developing countries to actualize their NDCs. China and the United States should support developing countries to assist with these climate impacts. Both countries should provide assistance when called upon by the global community.

As the representatives of youth in China and the United States, we demand our countries act proactively on climate change now. They must be ambitious, provide finance, support countries facing loss and damage, and help people adapt to climatic changes that are already happening.

CYCAN

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Press Conference Speakers:

Jing Liu, CYCAN

Kongrui Li, CYCAN

Nicholas Jones, Care About Climate

Sarah Voska, Care About Climate

To watch our Press Conference, you can view it on the UNFCCC Stream HERE.

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. (December, 2015). Paris Agreement.   

US-China Joint Presidential Statement on Climate Change. (September, 2015). White House