IYSECC Conference

Last week, I joined our partners for the Online Youth Exchange, China Youth Climate Action Network (CYCAN) in Tianjin for their 9th annual International youth summit on energy and climate change. The conference spanned the course of three days during which we learned about topics ranging from agriculture to architecture, fashion to food to address this year’s theme: Green Youth, Green Future. The main focuses were Green Food, Green Cities and Green Lifestyle.

Most exciting though, was that we had the chance to bring the Online Youth Exchange program offline for a couple of days and meet up! I began working with Echo of CYCAN two years ago, and have been talking with our OYE participants since the program year began last September, and to finally meet up was incredible. CYCAN generously funded travel scholarships for 4 OYE participants:

The four participants were joined by two Chinese OYErs, Yirui and Cherry (partners with Jasmita and Amalen, respectively) and the coordinator from CYCAN, Echo.

Together, our OYE team presented to approximately 75 students on a how to get engaged in activism. We began with a talk on how to get involved locally; we discussed power mapping and event planning. This was followed by a game, presented by Amalen, which simulated a campaign to stop a coal mine from being built in a forest. It was a great way to simulate the types of experiences and barriers that they might encounter should they move into activism, and they all seemed to be enjoying the thrill of the game as they ran back and forth across the room devising deals with the other groups. After a quick break, students returned to watch a video of OYE participants (thanks to David for his video editing skills!) and heard from all 4 OYE scholarship recipients about climate action in their own countries. We finished the seminar with a presentation on how to link local action with greater global movements and an explanation of the UNFCCC and COP.

We were interviewed and filmed by CGTN during our presentation. It was my first time being on TV ever, so it was exciting and nerve-wracking (for all of us!) Thankfully, Pradeep is a natural and his passion for protecting his homeland showed through. Special thanks to Cui “Hans” Hui’ao for his journalism!

Throughout the duration of the conference, we passed out climate sign stickers, and encouraged attendees to use the sign to symbolize a desire for action on climate change. We asked them to tell us why they Care About Climate, here’s what inspires them!

Accomplishments:

  • Distributed 250 Climate Sign Stickers
  • Took 40 Climate Sign photos
  • Presented to 75 students for 3 hours about the Online Youth Exchange, Care About Climate, how to get involved in activism campaigns, and global activism work.
  • Online-to-offline meet up of 9 OYE participants/coordinators.
  • Collected 36 phone contacts and 54 email addresses of interested parties
  • Received 10 responses to the OYE interest form on our website
  • Planned for OYE 3.0 programming and budget, based on feedback from OYE 2.0
  • Featured on TV on CGTN’s English channel, broadcast to approximately 500,000 viewers regionally.
  • Shared the Climate Sign with 300+ people
  • Solidified ties with CYCAN

Sarah Voska

Director, Online Youth Exchange

Care About Climate

Expanding the Tools for the Movement

Care About Climate was created to unite people around climate action with a climate symbol, similar to the peace sign for the nuclear disarmament movement in the seventies, and it has been working. People around the world have been using the climate symbol to show they want climate action now!

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During the UN Climate Conference in Paris, France we met another group, ClimateSign.org, that was working on a similar initiative, except they had a hand sign. It became clear to us that we could work together to give tools to the movement that would enable individuals around the world to unite for climate action.

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As of March 2016 ClimateSign.org has officially joined forces with Care About Climate to help connect communities around climate action with the climate symbol and hand sign. Information about these tools as well as a photo gallery will be hosted on www.climatesign.org, and on www.careaboutclimate.org you will be able to find information about the specific projects and initiatives we are working on as an organization.

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Similarly, photos and media about the Climate Sign tools (image and hand sign) can be found on the ClimateSign.org Facebook Page, on Twitter @ClimateSign, and on Instagram. Organizational information, initiatives, and photos will also be shared on Care About Climate’s Facebook Page, on Twitter @CareAboutClimate, and on Instagram. The majority of changes will occur behind-the-scenes, though you may notice some additions to our online presence and changes in our image in the coming weeks.

Our mission and goals will remain focused on empowering communities to take action to mitigate greenhouse gases and adapt in the face of climate change. Lucky for us, we now have a bigger, more diverse team to find success in these goals.
That is about it! Watch out for changes listed above on both CareAboutClimate.org and ClimateSign.org as we roll out a unified visual message. If you are interested in joining our team and have not already, sign up to receive updates and merchandise to spread #climatesign around the world. If you want to bring Care About Climate materials and efforts to your community, sign up to receive information about being a Climate Ambassador. Together we can inspire communities and countries to Act On Climate. Raise the #climatesign and become a part of the team!

We Have A Climate Agreement…. Now What?

On December 12, 2015 nations came together to sign the Paris Agreement. This is a new climate agreement that was designed to get nations to reduce their greenhouse gases and prevent further global warming. This agreement is revolutionary because all countries within the United Nations have to participate, and it outlines a process to attempt to keep global warming on average well below 1.5 degrees celsius.

So, what is this process? Essentially, nations agreed that they would submit pledges every five years to reduce emissions, and it is up to individual countries to fulfill those commitments through domestic policy with the help of international finance and aid, if needed. This allows individual nations to make policy decisions that make sense for them, while trying to collectively prevent a big problem. The catch is that they either need to keep their current pledges, or they need to up the ante and pledge more each time they submit their commitments.

Although this is a great first step, it is not going to get us to where we need to be without domestic action, organizing, and voting. The agreement is only as good as the pledges and policies that the countries make individually, and the pledges that the countries made in 2015 will still lead to a 3 degree celsius world.

We need to do more, much more, and it will be up to us to make that happen. We need to work locally to develop projects that mitigate greenhouse gas production, we need to elect politicians that care about climate change, and we need to advocate and vote for policies that help support a just transition to a clean energy economy. It will take all of us together to get this done.

This year is a particularly important year because we have the opportunity to take this agreement and demand action now. In the United States there will be an election that will determine the amount of resources, time, and effort that is given to address climate change by the US government. It will be critical to elect a president that cares about climate change, and will uphold what we promised to do in the Paris Agreement. It is up to you to get involved, vote for climate, and encourage others to do the same.

To start, you can show that you care about climate and that you want others to care about climate with the climate symbol. Help get the conversation about climate change started in your neighborhood, on your campus, and in your community. We need to show that we want action on climate change now! Get your free climate symbol stickers here.

If you would like to help in our Vote for Climate campaign email careaboutclimate@gmail.com.

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