Talanoa Dialogue at COP23

Tagalano Roa United Nations Climate change conference 2017 Bonn GermanyLast Year at COP22 in Marrakech, much of the media conversation was distracted by the US election results, and the instability of what would become of the Paris Agreement without the US’s commitment. Would it fall the way of the Kyoto Protocol? Would the economics work in its favor, as they did in the case of the Montreal Protocol? Countries weren’t sure, but they knew that inaction was too risky. They signed the Marrakech Action Protocol, indicating that they were all “Still In” regardless of what other countries decided. The decision was a powerful statement of unity for the environmental community worldwide, and a fierce posture against the new administration’s foreign policy stance. This effort was paired with a decision to include more non-state actors. Where states fail to act or where they are limited in their reach, their capacities can be expanded by including civil society in the implementation, tracking and policy making. This decision let to the organization of a Facilitative Dialogue in 2018.

The facilitative dialogue was called to address three questions:

              Where Are We?                            Where do we need to be?                             How do we get there?

These three questions were to be answered through a conversation between the stakeholders and the 196 nations that are part of the Paris Agreement.

COP23 Frank Bainimarama hosts an open dialogue with stakeholders from all constituency groups present. Talanoa session.

Stakeholders have long been fighting for a voice in the decision making of international climate change agreements, and this dialogue was especially important to youth.  Within the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), there are nine recognized constituency groups (a network of organizations that share a common purpose). They are: Business & Industry, Research & Investigation, Youth, Environmental, Local Government & Municipal Authorities, Indigenous Peoples, Farmers, Women & Gender, and Trade Unions. Each constituency has one or more policy position that they would like to see pushed through during the negotiations. Each of these constituency groups would now have a stronger voice through the Facilitative Dialogue.

 Fiji Prime Minister hosts the open dialogue
photo courtesy of IISD Reporting Services.

During Week One, Fiji Prime Minister and COP23 President, Frank Bainimarama and UNFCCC Executive Secretary Patricia Espinosa held an Open Dialogue between party actors and constituency groups. This was the first time for many constituency groups to have a seat at the table with equal footing and an equal voice in the conversation. Statements made by constituencies were given freely, not limited or timed as they typically are. The Fiji presidency compared the dialogue to a process called talanoa, a storytelling style used in the Pacific that emphasizes participation, inclusion and transparency, on a basis of trust and empathy.

Patricia Espinosa listens to constituency groups during talanoa session at COP23
photo courtesy of IISD Reporting Services.

Parties engaged as well, responding to concerns of different constituency groups. The UK mentioned locking business leaders in a room until they figured out how to transition to a green economy, while Mexico joked that their businesses went into the room willingly. Uganda talked about a national climate change forum they held with non-party stakeholders to engage youth and community organizations in climate change adaptation.

Youth asked for greater focus on climate empowerment, with financial and institutional support for their programs so that they can take action in their home countries. We also asked for climate empowerment, capacity building, and climate change education to be included in countries’ national climate action plans, especially for mitigation.

COP23 YOUNGO intervention talanoa dialogue
photo courtesy of IISD Reporting Services.

Moving into next year, there will be an online platform where we can contribute to the dialogue to try and answer some of these questions of where we’re at, where we’re going, and how to get there. The purpose of this dialogue is to create solutions, to drive innovation, and propose realistic means through which we limit global average temperature rise to 1.5⁰C.  Next year will be the big year to get these solutions together so that countries can start putting them in place worldwide before the 2023 Global Stocktake, when a count will be done of each country’s present and reduced emissions, carbon sinks, and mitigation efforts.

Youth around the world are already acting on the ground to create synergy for emissions reductions. Plant-for-the-Planet, Climate Smart Agriculture Youth Network, and CliMates are just a couple examples of organizations that bring thousands of youth together for reforestation, less invasive farming, and campaign building. For capacity-building, Youth Climate Lab, China Youth Climate Action Network and Care About Climate have created tools for youth worldwide to connect on online platforms to discuss the issues, solutions, and strategies for youth activists to be most effective in their work to address climate change locally, regionally or nationally. In terms of policy action, on an international level, we have working groups within YOUNGO that address many policy issues such as

Kava- a traditional Pacific drink

Adaptation, Women & Gender, Capacity-Building, Oceans, etc. These work to consolidate our policy positions into a specific request of policy-makers.

Over the next year, the UNFCCC will be continuing the Talanoa Dialogue at intersessionals in May and at COP24 in Poland. We look forward to drinking kava and having many more talanoa sessions! In the meantime, we’ll be continuing with our capacity building work year-round and working to make it as inclusive and transparent as possible. As Mr. Bainimarama said, “We are all in the same canoe“, we must work together to find & implement solutions.

By Sarah Voska

Sarah Voska is a delegate to the UN climate change conference, COP23, and the director of the Online Youth Exchange. She studies Sustainable Management at University of Wisconsin-Parkside. Use the #ClimateSign to join the fight against climate change. Contact us at careaboutclimate@gmail.com with any questions!

Nepal’s role in COP and Issues of Climate Finance

COP 23 and Nepal’s Agenda?

This year becomes very challenging, because of natural disaster around a world. More than 1200 people lost their life because of flood in Nepal, Bangladesh and India. United States of America faced a devastating hurricane and incidence of fire. Many of the part of world faced the recorded hit of heat waves and storms. All this cost to loss of billions of property. Some day before, World Metrological Organization release a report with a warning sign of global average concentration of Carbon dioxide reached 403.3 parts of millions (ppm) in 2016. This reports also says that this concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increase at record speed last year to hit a level not seen for more than three millions years.[1] With this all on the board, worlds leaders, academician, representatives from civil society, climate activists, media and youth are gathering at Bonn for UN Climate Change Conference.

What is COP 23?

This year, 23rd Meeting of Conference of Parties to UNFCCC will take place from 6 to 17 November at Bonn, Germany. The conference will be convened under the Presidency of Fiji. This meeting will focus on the development of guidance on how the Paris Agreement’s provisions will be implemented across a wide range of issues including transparency, adaptation, emission reductions, and provision of finance, capacity building and technology. There will also be the thirteenth session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 13), second part of the first session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement (CMA 1.2). There will also be the forty seventh session of the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice (SBSTA 47), forty seventh session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation (SBI 47) and fourth part of the first session of the AD Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement (APA 1.4). The COP, the CMP and the CMA are the supreme decision making bodies for the Convention, the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Agreement respectively[2]. This is a regular meeting of UNFCCC but will also be very important as this will be on of the very important steps for the effective implementation of Paris Agreement.

Being a party to the UNFCCC, Nepal has also participated in the COP meeting from the beginning. Nepal has participated with a strong voice raising the important agenda of Nepal. This year also, governmental delegation led by the Honorable Minister for Ministry of Population and Environment, Government of Nepal, representatives from Civil Society, Climate Activist, representatives from media house have already headed to Bonn to participate in meeting.

What are the main agenda of Nepal for COP 23?

Before moving to Bonn, Ministry of Population and Environment has prepared a Nepal’s Agenda paper with a series of consultation workshop in Nepal. Nepal has focused and call for the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement, financial support to undertake the adaptation and mitigation actions in the country. Nepal has also raised the issues related to financing of adaption, financing of loss and damage and consideration of agriculture within the formal negotiations process. Nepal has focused in the harnessing of international cooperation and support in technology development for the implementation of NAPA priority projects. Nepal has also focused for the international effort for the access of small holder farmers to adjust their farmers systems and move toward low carbon efficient practices and to increase the access of farmers to weather and climate information services and financial schemes. Nepal has priorities adaptation finance and technology transfer as a key to Nepal and LDCs. Nepal has also put forwarded to discuss on the modalities for accounting financial resources and clear clarity on the financial instruments, difference between the ODA and the climate finance. Nepal will also raise the issues for the easy and simplified access of international funds, capacity building of Least Developed Countries like Nepal. Nepal will raise all this issues during the different meetings, side events.

Being one of the most vulnerable countries because of the negative impact of climate change and Least Developed Countries, Conference of Parties to UNFCCC is very much important for Nepal, to raise the Nepal’s Agenda on the global arena. So, Nepal delegation team has not to miss any chance to grab the opportunity which is foremost to achieve the Nepal’s goal.

Written By Pradeep

Pradeep is a climate activist from Nepal and currently he is working with Prakriti Resources Centre (PRC) as a Programme Officer. He is also a part of Online Youth Exchange Program run by Care About Climate and China Youth Climate Action Network.

 

A Nepali Perspective on the IYSECC Conference

On July 8th, I started my journey for a week to China. I was excited to meet lots of friends from different countries. More that that though, I was excited to meet my friends from the Online Youth Exchange program with whom I have talked virtually for more than 9 months- talking on different environmental issues. I was also excited because I was going to attend an international summit discussion on the climate change issues which is one of the major problems to the present world.

There is a no doubt that youth are the one who are and will face the extremes events of climate change and are the one who can act and made a change for better world. With an aims to encourage young people from around the world to get involved in the fight against climate change the international Youth Summit on Energy and Climate Change was held from 9th to 12th July 2017 at Tianjin University, China.  This summit was so important to young people like me, because the theme of this program was mainly focused on clothing, food, housing and transportation. The program was mainly focused on how to change our life to sustainable lifestyle contributing to minimize our carbon footprint.

The paramount about program was it was focused on the things that we use in our daily life such as transport, food, and clothes. This program provided an insight to explore the options for young people to made our life standard sustainable. In the present context, one of the major problems of the earth is unsustainable consumption and unmanaged wastes like plastic.  So, this program added an idea to young people to obtain sustainable lifestyle.

Different presentations, presented on the issues of consumption, transportation, green habit, on waste management were very informative. Presentation on Innovative Urban Planning for Low Carbon Transportation presented by different experts was very useful and I got to know about the way to obtain the low carbon transportation and planning. Mainly, they shared the concept about the transportation planning in China such as Transportation Oriented Development which was very much interesting and knowledgeable. Similarly, the presentation on Saying No to Landfills: the green conversion of waste provided an knowledge on the proper waste management for greener environment. The formal and informal discussion with the different like-minded people from different countries and more to Chinese friends has added a strong step to fight against the different environmental issues existing in the world.

Together with this, getting to make new Chinese friends was really nice. Their help and coordination was very much appreciated. The way of development in the city and management was really inspiring.

Online to Offline Youth Exchange Program

Environmental problems are the most pressing issues in the present time all around the world. Every country is facing the different environmental problems such as air pollution, water pollution, unmanaged waste management, climate change etc. With an aim to enhance the capacity of young people, CYCAN and Care about Climate organized a program Online to Offline Youth Exchange program. Being a member of the OYE, I have get a chance to engage and strengthen my network with different youth from globe. To be a part of OYE I felt very lucky. This platform has enhanced my capacity and build a confidence to talk on the different environmental issues and topics. This has helped us to create a strong web network among friends from different countries.

Himalayan Mountains Climate Change Nepal Youth Climate Action Network

During the conference, we seven OYE member, Amalen (Malaysia), Mohamed (Egypt), Jasmita (Nepal) including Cheery and Yirui from China participated. The support and coordination of Sarah from Care about Climate and Echo from CYCAN was much appreciated. We seven participated and facilitated the session on “International Cooperation and Youth Action”. In this session, Sarah presented her story on how she inspired to get engaged with environment, Mohamed and Jasmita also shared their journey working on climate change issues in their countries. Amalen facilitated on game which engaged all the participants. I presented on the impact of climate change in Nepal. The session was mainly focused on how to engage the youths in international cooperation for climate action. The half day session was ended with the distribution of certificate of Online to Offline Youth Exchange Program.

By Pradeep

Pradeep is a founding partner of Smart Ltd, an environmental consulting firm and former network director of Nepalese Youth for Climate Action. He lives in Kathmandu and has a Master’s degree in Environmental Science.  Use the #ClimateSign to join the fight against climate change.

Press Release: Statement by US and Chinese Youth Directed at Our Presidents and President-Elect

 

For Immediate Release

CYCAN and CAC delegates present their joint statement directed to their leaders.

Marrakesh, Morocco-  Dear President Barack Obama, President Xi Jinping, and President-Elect Donald Trump,

Last year the world came together to create the Paris Agreement. Both the United States and China have ratified this agreement. However, we still have a lot to do, and US and Chinese governments are morally as well as legally responsible to do everything in their power to address climate change as soon as possible.  As the two largest global economies and greenhouse gas emitters, our countries have the opportunity to lead the world forward in climate action.

In this statement CYCAN and CAC seek to share a unified vision for what we expect the United States and China to support in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties 22 (UNFCCC COP 22) and beyond, and in doing so, continue to build stronger working relationships between our two countries. We are calling for action from both parties to work on pre-2020 ambitions, adaptation, climate finance and loss & damage. This must be done while promoting and considering “obligations to human rights, the right to health, the rights of indigenous peoples, local communities, migrants, children, persons with disabilities and people in vulnerable situations and the right to development, as well as gender equality, empowerment of women and intergenerational equity.”

The US and China need to share technological resources and provide capacity-building to developing countries in order to provide the tools necessary for countries to adapt to climate change, including addressing impacts to agriculture, coastal cities, and vulnerable populations.  Last September, the United States reaffirmed its $3 billion pledge to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) and China announced that it would make available 20 billion Renminbi for setting up the China South-South Climate Cooperation Fund to support other developing countries to combat climate change.

We call on the United States and China to provide a clear pathway to providing finance to developing countries to actualize their NDCs. China and the United States should support developing countries to assist with these climate impacts. Both countries should provide assistance when called upon by the global community.

As the representatives of youth in China and the United States, we demand our countries act proactively on climate change now. They must be ambitious, provide finance, support countries facing loss and damage, and help people adapt to climatic changes that are already happening.

CYCAN

cropped-Cac-Logo.png

Press Conference Speakers:

Jing Liu, CYCAN

Kongrui Li, CYCAN

Nicholas Jones, Care About Climate

Sarah Voska, Care About Climate

To watch our Press Conference, you can view it on the UNFCCC Stream HERE.

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. (December, 2015). Paris Agreement.   

US-China Joint Presidential Statement on Climate Change. (September, 2015). White House